Raul Jusinto

Red Rock Canyon


Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area

Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area
The historic Pine Creek Homestead. Horace Wilson lived here in the 1920s. Vandals burned the house down in the 1960s.

Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area
The historic Sanstone Quarry.

Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area

Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area

Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area markers reads:

The natural resources of Red Rock Canyon have drawn people to this area for at least 10,000 years. People from several early cultures came and went, leaving just scattered pottery fragments and stone tools. The Southern Paiute and their rock art, rock shelters and roasting pits can still be seen today.

Evidence of more recent European presence in Red Rock Canyon includes historic trails, the Wilson Homestead at Pine Creek, and remnants of a quarry site at Sandstone. As you explore Red Rock Canyon, you’ll discover reminders of the people who have lived off its resources, enjoyed its vistas and left their marks on the land.

Red Rock Canyon has been an oasis for generations. Hunters and gatherers roamed Southern Nevada as early as 10,000 years ago. Later residents included Ancient Puebloans and Patayans. Paiutes and their ancestors arrived about 5,000 years ago. They wintered in the valley farming mesquite and other crops, then camped, hunted and harvested pine nuts in summer and fall.

Paiutes built brush shelters for shade and sought comfort in caves and rock shelters. Many caves and campsites, found in Red Rock Canyon, serve as reminders of these first peoples and provide glimpses into their lives.

Nevada State Route 159 (Red Rock Road) is listed as Nevada Scenic Byway (1995).

Located at Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area.