Raul Jusinto

Lake Mead


Lake Mead

Lake Mead

Lake Mead

Lake Mead

Lake Mead
This was once the world's largest floating restaurant.

Lake Mead
Lake Mead Visitor Center. Built in 1966. Located at 10 Lakeshore Road in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area.

Lake Mead
The Hover Dam Aggregate Plant is located underneath the water of Lake Mead.

Lake Mead
A sunken Higgins Boat that was used to survey the Colorado River is located underneath the water of Lake Mead.

Lake Mead
A PBYCatalina flying boat that crashed into Lake Mead in 1949 is located underneath the water of Lake Mead.

B-29 Serial No. 45-21847 Heavy Bomber
A B-29 that crashed into Lake Mead in 1948 is located underneath the water of Lake Mead. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Lost City
Most of the ancient Pueblo Grande de Nevada is submerged by the water of Lake Mead. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Photograph of Lake Mead rising over Lost City, June 1938. Pueblo Grande Collection. UNLV Libraries Special Collections & Archives.

Fort Callville
The abandoned 1860s Fort Callville is submerged by the water of Lake Mead.

Lake Mead
Elwood Mead (1858-1936).

National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Lake Mead National Recreation Area marker reads:

The Boulder Dam Project created Lake Mead. Completed in 1935, the dam blocked the Colorado River as the river turned southward here into Black Canyon. The backed-up waters formed a 110-mile-long series of basins and coves, now known collectively as Lake Mead.

Since its establishment in 1936, the recreation area around Lake Mead has been managed by the National Park Service. In 1947 Boulder Dam was renamed Hoover Dam. At that time the area of Lake Mohave, stretching 67 miles southward from Hoover Dam to Davis Dam, was added to the recreation area.

In 1964 Congress established this entire area as Lake Mead National Recreation Area. This was the first nationally designated recreation area in the country.

Queho Posse Chapter 1919 E Clampus Vitus marker reads:

Born in 1858, Dr. Elwood Mead became a world-renowned water and irrigation engineer. He wrote Wyoming’s first water code, the basis for codes throughout the United States, Australia, Canada, South Africa and New Zealand. He wrote the Carey Act, led water conservation and irrigation efforts in Victoria, Australia, and Palestine, created the Rural Institutions Program for the University of California, and led the first federal irrigation studies. He was the Bureau of Reclamation’s first commissioner, serving from 1924 until his death in 1936. His last great project was Hoover Dam.

Located in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area.