Raul Jusinto

Gold Butte


Gold Butte

Gold Butte
"Gold Butte National Monument, Nevada" by Bureau of Land Management is licensed under CC BY 2.0.

Devils Throat
"In the early 1900s, a cowboy and miners working in the area were amazed by a cloud of dust that suddenly rose from the desert flat as the sinkhole that would be known as Devils Throat opened. Devils Throat is now about 110-120 feet wide, and it continues to widen as the rim erodes and caves in. Within Gold Butte National Monument there are other sinkholes. At least one was larger, but is now filled, while several other sinkholes remain open." (National Conservation Lans marker)."Devils Throat, Gold Butte National Monument" by Matthew Dillon is licensed under CC BY 2.0.

Gold Butte Dam
"Gold Butte National Monument" by Matthew Dillon is licensed under CC BY 2.0.

Connoly Corral
"Gold Butte National Monument" by Matthew Dillon is licensed under CC BY 2.0.

Gold Butte Post Office

Historic cultural and mining district ghost town dating back to the early 1900s.

National Conservation Lands marker reads:

The tent city of Golde Butte was formally established when a post office opened in early 1906. This area, downtown Gold Butte, included the post office, a store, a saloon, and a brothel. Supplies were hauled by wagon from the the town of St. Thomas, which lies two days travel by wagon to the northwest across the Virgin River. At the peak of mining activity, Gold Butte had about 2,000 residents, all living out of canvas tents spread out across the valley behind you. By late 1910, the mining boom had ended, the miners had packed up and drifted away, and the Golde Butte post office closed.

Listed as a National Monument in 2016.

Located in Clark County.